September is National Preparedness Month. Being prepared for an emergency can mean the difference between life and death. The resources included here will not only help you prepare for an emergency, but will also teach your homeschool students how to plan and the importance of preparation.

 

1.1 Article: “How Can I Raise My Children to Bless Others?”

Jenny Herman shares her experience with one little girl who befriended her son who has special needs. She goes on to wonder how we can teach empathy to our children.

www.crosswalk.com/newsletters-only/crosswalk-home-school-update/how-can-i-raise-my-children-to-bless-others.html

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1.2 Emergency Preparation

This resource from the American Red Cross can help you prepare your children for many types of emergencies. Each potentially catastrophic event listed has suggestions for before, during, and after the event.

www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types-of-emergencies

You can use the instructions on this page to create a family emergency preparedness kit as well as an emergency plan. The resources also include downloadable forms, information on fighting cabin fever, and what to do after the emergency.

https://seemomclick.com/emergency-preparedness-kit-projectenvolve

If disaster should strike, would you have all of your critical information handy and ready to move with you on a moment’s notice? Creating a family emergency binder with phone numbers and contact information, financial information, copies of vital documents, medical information, legal documents, and insurance information can help make a stressful time more manageable. You can use these resources to start a family emergency notebook.

http://momwithaprep.com/make-a-family-emergency-binders-free-download

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1.3 Preparing Your Preschoolers

The American Library Association’s Get Ready Get Safe Book List includes books for young children on learning to overcome fears, understanding how to prepare for emergencies, and learning about monitoring the weather and specific types of disasters.

www.ala.org/alsc/publications-resources/book-lists/get-ready-get-safe-book-list

This 10-page resource from the Sesame Street website can help prepare your preschooler for emergencies. It includes worksheets for learning their first and last names, learning their address and phone number, an introduction to first responders and community helpers, as well as information on preparing a family emergency plan.

www.sesamestreet.org/sites/default/files/media_folders/Images/PSEG_ePrepFamilyGuide_R10FINAL.pdf

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1.4 Severe Weather and Safety

This downloadable coloring book can help your students learn about severe weather and how to be safe.

http://linncounty-ema.org/attachments/Lets_learn_about_severe_weather.pdf

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s resources on emergency preparedness include lesson plans by grade level and links to many other resources on emergency planning.

First and second grade lesson plans:

www.fema.gov/media-library-data/543412ca31bff9997896913115536a10/FEMA_LE_TG_082613_508.pdf

Third- through fifth- grade lesson plans:

www.fema.gov/media-library-data/a09faf19c5354c01beb9f30125a785cb/FEMA_UE_TG_082613_508.pdf

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1.5 Communicating Emergency Preparedness

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s resources on emergency preparedness for high school students includes lesson plans which incorporate graphing, problem solving, and creating a disaster preparedness campaign by brainstorming and mind-mapping.

www.fema.gov/media-library-data/ac2a3fd06796f89fcd284ddb3fea4797/FEMA_HS_TG_082613_508.pdf

Ready.gov is an official website of the Department of Homeland Security. You can find resources on social media preparedness toolkits. There are links to preparation resources as well as social media campaigns designed to educate the public about natural disasters and safety.

www.ready.gov/toolkits

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Emergency Preparedness 1

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