Q. I received a call saying they were waiting for the superintendent’s “approval” of my Notice of Intent. I thought I didn’t need to get “approval.”

A. You are correct. Parents file a notice that shows their intent to homeschool and how they have complied with the Virginia homeschool law. 

Sometimes the superintendent’s staff doesn’t clearly understand the law and will refer to “approval” of a Notice of Intent (NOI) form. If you want, you can send the superintendent’s contact person an email or you can call to clarify that you are not waiting for “approval” because the homeschool statute does not give the superintendent authority to “approve” your homeschool. You are simply notifying him of your intention to home instruct by showing him how you have complied with the law.

The Virginia homeschool statute §22.1-254.1 does not require that a superintendent respond to a NOI, but many superintendents will acknowledge receipt in a letter. Some send a form letter to all homeschoolers at the same time, usually late in September. Others send nothing.

This is the reason a delivery receipt is important. With a signed return-receipt from the post office or a date-stamped receipt for a hand-delivered NOI, you have proof that you submitted your intent form or letter.

I expect if there is a problem with your NOI, you will hear from the superintendent’s office. Don’ Before providing additional information, review the law to make sure their request is consistent with the statute’s requirements. Call the HEAV office at 804-278-9200 if you have questions.

In the event you do not receive a letter of response from the superintendent, you would simply begin homeschooling.

Best regards,
Yvonne

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3 Comments

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  1. Ann Graves says:

    There has been a change in the Religious Exemption language though. They get to approve your religious intention… such baloney and a blatent abuse of freedom of religion.

  2. Yvonne Bunn says:

    The religious exemption law (22.1-254(B)(1) has not changed. According to the statute, the school board has the responsibility to determine if your religious training or beliefs are bona fide or sincere, not merely political, sociological or philosophical views. Some school board policies may have changed, but the law has not. ~Yvonne, HEAV

  3. Webster says:

    Did they use option (iv)? In that case, there would need to be approval, right?