by Lynna Sutherland

There are so many wonderful things to see and explore in the Exhibit Hall each year at the HEAV Convention. This year, I especially enjoyed getting to visit the booths of a few of the Young Entrepreneurs and talk to them about how they got their start in small business. Allow me to introduce you to some of them!

Emily Bass of “Modesty n Mind”

Emily is now 15 years old and estimates that she has been sewing since she was eight or nine. Because she’s taller than average, she had trouble finding skirts of a comfortable length. She also admits to being particular about the style and cut of her clothing, so sewing her own was a natural answer.

Eventually, the father of a friend at church commented on the quality of her work and encouraged her that there was definitely a market for affordable, modest, and stylish clothing for young ladies. Emily’s father helped her to develop a business name and logo and Modesty N Mind was born!

Emily sells both premade and custom designed clothing. In the afternoons, when her younger siblings have rest time, she has free time which she usually spend on sewing projects. Check out her Facebook page for pictures of her work as well as to contact her to place an order!

Lauren Walsh of “Crafty Nut”

At just 13 years of age, Lauren was the youngest entrepreneur I met. She has always enjoyed craft projects and about a year and a half ago had a chance to participate in her first craft fair at her church. Since then she’s enjoyed sharing what she makes. She makes necklaces, jewelry and other accessories. She calls her business “Crafty Nut” because she’s nuts about crafting! You can contact her via email.

 

Jordan Lear of Adorkable

Last year, Jordan was taking a writing class from Mr. Brian Wasko of Write at Home. The class studied “The Great Gatsby” and Jordan was smitten with the book. She was surprised to find that there wasn’t much available in the way of fan jewelry or accessories, however. So she started making necklaces and other accessories, all with a literary theme! You can find pictures of her work on her Facebook page, Adorkable.

Anna Curry of Rosewood Cottage

Since Anna’s middle name is Rose and she gravitates towards a country or farm style in her craft and creating, she chose the name “Rosewood Cottage” for her business selling accessories and home goods. She has already invested a considerable amount in a professional embroidery machine and software to operate it. She’ll take her business and these assets with her when she gets married shortly!

Prior to hosting a booth in the Young Entrepreneurs section of the Exhibit hall, Anna volunteered for seven years in the HEAV Children’s program. She enjoyed sharing her love for crafts with young friends who stopped by her booth to say hello. She feels it’s important to show younger children how her tools and equipment work, because that’s how she began to learn about sewing – from older mentors who were kind enough to share with her!

 

The Role of Homeschooling

Though these ladies are all different ages, sell different types of products and have different stories to tell, there was one commonality. All of these young entrepreneurs expressed that being homeschooled was a definite advantage to getting started in business. In addition to the flexible schedule affording by homeschooling, they mentioned other perks as well, such as comfort communicating with people of all ages, and the ability to count their work for high school credit!

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Lynna Sutherland blogs at Homeschooling Without Training Wheels, where she loves to remind moms (and herself!) of the freedom and flexibility that come with homeschooling! Lynna and her husband have seven children. The motto of their homeschool is “Wisdom Is the Principal Thing” from Proverbs 4:7. You can also find Lynna on Instagram, Facebook and Pinterest.